Tuesday September 19th 2017

Longer reads: Hospice drains Medicare; false Obamacare ‘horror stories;’ growing up without vaccines

Hospice patients are expected to die: The treatment focuses on providing comfort to the terminally ill, not finding a cure. To enroll a patient, two doctors certify a life expectancy of six months or less. But over the past decade, the number of “hospice survivors” in the United States has risen dramatically, in part because hospice companies earn more by recruiting patients who aren’t actually dying, a Washington Post investigation has found. Healthier patients are more profitable because they require fewer visits and stay enrolled longer (Peter Whoriskey and Dan Keating, 12/26).

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Longer reads: Hospice drains Medicare; false Obamacare ‘horror stories;’ growing up without vaccines

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