Monday May 29th 2017

Safety and efficacy of ofatumumab in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: A phase 2 study

Conclusions: Ofatumumab (up to 700 mg) given 2 weeks apart was not associated with any unexpected safety concerns and was well tolerated in patients with RRMS. MRI data suggest a clinically meaningful effect of ofatumumab for all doses studied. Results warrant further exploration of ofatumumab in RRMS. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that in patients with RRMS, ofatumumab compared with placebo does not increase the number of serious adverse events and decreases the number of new MRI lesions. (Source: Neurology)

More – 

Safety and efficacy of ofatumumab in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: A phase 2 study

Leave a Comment

More from category

Revisions Underway to McDonald Criteria on MS Diagnosis Revisions Underway to McDonald Criteria on MS Diagnosis
Revisions Underway to McDonald Criteria on MS Diagnosis Revisions Underway to McDonald Criteria on MS Diagnosis

An expert panel is tackling the first revision to the multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria in 7 years. Among proposed [Read More]

Connecticut State Budget Call to Action
Connecticut State Budget Call to Action

/About-the-Society/News/Connecticut-State-Budget-Call-to-Action [Read More]

A Surge of New Drug Data in Multiple Sclerosis A Surge of New Drug Data in Multiple Sclerosis
A Surge of New Drug Data in Multiple Sclerosis A Surge of New Drug Data in Multiple Sclerosis

Medscape sits down with two neurologists to discuss advances in multiple sclerosis as presented at this year's American [Read More]

Progress on Bills to Address Step Therapy
Progress on Bills to Address Step Therapy

/About-the-Society/News/Progress-on-Bills-to-Address-Step-Therapy [Read More]

Brain Gadolinium Deposition Varies With Contrast Agent in MS Brain Gadolinium Deposition Varies With Contrast Agent in MS
Brain Gadolinium Deposition Varies With Contrast Agent in MS Brain Gadolinium Deposition Varies With Contrast Agent in MS

Gadolinium accumulation in the brain is greater with linear GBCAs than with macrocyclics. Multiple sclerosis experts [Read More]