Sunday January 21st 2018

The pill times 2: What every woman with multiple sclerosis should know

Until fingolimod came along, the first Food and Drug Administration–approved pill for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), teratogenicity of multiple sclerosis (MS) drugs had not been a big issue. Strange, for a disease that affects primarily women of childbearing age. Why? Because previously approved MS drugs were all large recombinant protein molecules. Large molecules cross the placenta by active transport, an issue for natalizumab (a monoclonal antibody), but only after the first trimester, during which the critical periods for organogenesis have been completed. The most commonly used self-injectables (β-interferons and glatiramer acetate) are barely detectable in the circulation and have no known active transport mechanisms. Then came fingolimod, a pill that requi…

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The pill times 2: What every woman with multiple sclerosis should know

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