Monday May 29th 2017

OHSU: Edible pot could help ease certain multiple sclerosis symptoms

An Oregon Health & Science University researcher has found that orally ingested cannabis could help ease certain multiple sclerosis symptoms. The symptoms, which might be tempered by medical marijuana pills and oral medical marijuana spray, include spasticity, pain related to spasticity and frequent urination. “Using different (complimentary and alternative medicine) therapies is common in 33 (percent) to 80 percent of people with MS, particularly those who are female, have higher education levels… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)

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OHSU: Edible pot could help ease certain multiple sclerosis symptoms

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