Monday January 22nd 2018

Systematic literature review and validity evaluation of the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite…

Conclusions: Recognizing their strengths and weaknesses, both EDSS and MSFC are suitable to detect the effectiveness of clinical interventions and to monitor disease progression. Almost all publications identify the EDSS as the most widely used tool to measure disease outcomes in clinical trials. Despite some limitations, both instruments are accepted as endpoints and neither are discussed as surrogate parameters in identified publications. A great advantage of the EDSS is its international acceptance (e.g. by EMA) as a primary endpoint in clinical trials and its broad use in trials, enabling cross-study comparisons. (Source: BMC Neurology)

Continued: 

Systematic literature review and validity evaluation of the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite…

Leave a Comment

More from category

Government Shutdown’s Impact on People with MS
Government Shutdown’s Impact on People with MS

/About-the-Society/News/Government-Shutdown-s-Impact-on-People-with-MS [Read More]

Researchers unravel key molecular mechanism of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases
Researchers unravel key molecular mechanism of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases

An international team of researchers led by prof. Savvas Savvides has unraveled a crucial aspect of the molecular basis [Read More]

Kessler Foundation wins $735,000 grant for training rehabilitation researchers
Kessler Foundation wins $735,000 grant for training rehabilitation researchers

Guang Yue, PhD, director of Human Performance and Engineering Research at Kessler Foundation, has been awarded a [Read More]

6,000-year-old track record for healing leaky gut
6,000-year-old track record for healing leaky gut

When I was traveling in India, I had the privilege of studying Ayurvedic medicine with traditional Master Healers. [Read More]

Study shows high-salt diet causes dementia in mice
Study shows high-salt diet causes dementia in mice

A high-salt diet reduces resting blood flow to the brain and causes dementia in mice, according to a new study by [Read More]