Saturday February 24th 2018

Immune surveillance of the central nervous system in multiple sclerosis — Relevance for therapy and experimental models

Treatment of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune disorders frequently involves the reduction, or depletion of immune-competent cells. Alternatively, immune cells are being sequestered away from the target organ by interfering with their movement from secondary lymphoid organs, or their migration into tissues. These therapeutic strategies have been successful in multiple sclerosis (MS), the most prevalent autoimmune inflammatory disorder of the CNS. However, many of the agents that are currently approved or in clinical development also have severe potential adverse effects that stem from the very mechanisms that mediate their beneficial effects by interfering with CNS immune surveillance. (Source: Journal of Neuroimmunology)

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Immune surveillance of the central nervous system in multiple sclerosis — Relevance for therapy and experimental models

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